Eleanor Roosevelt Quotes

On this page you can find the TOP of Eleanor Roosevelt's best quotes! We hope you will find some sayings from Former First Lady of the United States Eleanor Roosevelt's in our collection, which will inspire you to new achievements! There are currently 519 quotes on this page collected since October 11, 1884! Share our collection of quotes with your friends on social media so that they can find something to inspire them!
All quotes by Eleanor Roosevelt: Abuse Acceptance Adventure Age Aging Anger Appreciation Art Atheism Attitude Beauty Being Happy Being Strong Being Successful Being Yourself Belief Birthdays Books Business Caring Challenges Change Character Charity Children Choices Church Communication Communism Community Compromise Confidence Conscience Country Courage Criticism Critics Curiosity Decisions Democracy Depression Desire Determination Dignity Discrimination Diversity Doubt Dreams Duty Economy Education Efficiency Emotions Empowerment Encouraging Energy Experience Failing Fear Feelings Fighting First Lady Freedom Friends Friendship Future Giving Goals Gossip Growing Old Growth Happiness Heart Helping Others History Home Honor Hope Horror Human Dignity Human Rights Hunger Husband Imagination Individual Rights Inspiration Inspirational Inspiring Integrity Joy Justice Labor Leadership Learning Liberty Life Life And Love Live Life Losing Loss Love Lying Mankind Military Mistakes Morning Mothers Motivation Motivational Moving Forward Nature Nursing Old Age Opportunity Overcoming Pain Parties Past Patriotism Peace Personal Responsibility Political Parties Politics Positive Positivity Poverty Prejudice Progress Purpose Quality Reading Recovery Relationships Responsibility Running Sacrifice School Security Self Confidence Self Esteem Social Justice Soul Spirituality Strength Stress Success Suffering Tea Teaching Today Understanding United Nations Values War Water Weakness Wife Wisdom Work Youth more...
  • I have often felt that I cheated my children a little. I was never so totally theirs as most mothers are. I gave to audiences whatbelonged to my children, got back from audiences the love my children longed to give me.

  • To tell the people in the West not to use their cars means that these people may never see another soul for weeks and weeks nor have a way of getting a sick person to a doctor.

  • About the only value the story of my life may have is to show that one can, even without any particular gifts, overcome obstacles that seem insurmountable if one is willing to face the fact that they must be overcome.

    Eleanor Roosevelt (1961). “Autobiography”
  • If it's a man's game so decidedly that a woman would be soiled by entering it, then there is something radically wrong with the American game of politics.

  • Autobiographies are only useful as the lives you read about and analyze may suggest to you something that you may find useful in your own journey through life.

    Eleanor Roosevelt (2014). “The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt”, p.7, Harper Collins
  • Comparison is the thief of all joy.

  • When it's better for everyone, it's better for everyone.

  • Do something everyday that scares you.

  • I believe in active citizenship, for men and women equally, as a simple matter of right and justice. I believe we will have better government in all of our countries when men and women discuss public issues together and make their decisions on the basis of their different areas of experience and their common concern for the welfare of their families and their world.

    Eleanor Roosevelt (1995). “What I Hope to Leave Behind: The Essential Essays of Eleanor Roosevelt”, Carlson Pub
  • The mobilization of world opinion and methods of negotiation should be developed and used by every nation in order to strengthen the United Nations.

    Eleanor Roosevelt, David Emblidge (2001). “My Day: The Best of Eleanor Roosevelt's Acclaimed Newspaper Columns, 1936-1962”, p.211, Da Capo Press
  • the term 'young adults' which is so often used today seems to me a misnomer, and one which, if taken seriously, may lead the adolescent into misunderstanding as to his nature and his role in life. 'Young" he is; 'adult' he is not.

  • We cannot exist as a little island of well-being in a world where two-thirds of the people go to bed hungry every night.

  • Caring comes from being able to put yourself in the position of the other person.

    Eleanor Roosevelt (1961). “Autobiography”
  • To be a citizen in a democracy, a human being must be given a healthy start.

    Eleanor Roosevelt (1995). “What I Hope to Leave Behind: The Essential Essays of Eleanor Roosevelt”, Carlson Pub
  • A great deal of fear is a result of just “not knowing.” We do not know what is involved in a new situation. We do not know whether we can deal with it. The sooner we learn what it entails, the sooner we can dissolve our fear.

    Eleanor Roosevelt (1960). “You Learn by Living”, p.34, Westminster John Knox Press
  • I never thought of achievement. I just did what came along for me to do - the thing that gave me the most pleasure.

  • Change means the unknown.

    Eleanor Roosevelt (2012). “Tomorrow Is Now: It Is Today That We Must Create the World of the Future”, p.63, Penguin
  • It takes courage to love, but pain through love is the purifying fire which those who love generously know. We all know people who are so much afraid of pain that they shut themselves up like clams in a shell and, giving out nothing, receive nothing and therefore shrink until life is a mere living death.

    Life  
    Eleanor Roosevelt, David Emblidge (2009). “My Day: The Best of Eleanor Roosevelt's Acclaimed Newspaper Columns, 1936-1962”, p.36, Da Capo Press
  • The purpose of life afterall is to live it.

    Eleanor Roosevelt (1960). “You Learn by Living”, p.12, Westminster John Knox Press
  • Our children should learn the general framework of their government and then they should know where they come in contact with the government, where it touches their daily lives and where their influence is exerted on the government. It must not be a distant thing, someone else's business, but they must see how every cog in the wheel of a democracy is important and bears its share of responsibility for the smooth running of the entire machine.

  • You can't move so fast that you try to change the mores faster than people can accept it. That doesn't mean you do nothing, but it means that you do the things that need to be done according to priority.

  • I have complete faith in the American people's ability if they know and if they have leadership.

    Source: www.hrc.utexas.edu
  • Do one thing every day that scares you.

  • I wonder if Communists occupied in producing plays are not safer than Communists starving to death. I have always felt that whatever your beliefs might be, if you could earn enough to keep body and soul together and had to be pretty busy doing that, you would not be very apt to have time to plot the overthrow of any existing government.

    Eleanor Roosevelt, David Emblidge (2009). “My Day: The Best of Eleanor Roosevelt's Acclaimed Newspaper Columns, 1936-1962”, p.39, Da Capo Press
  • In business courtesy and efficiency have a symbiotic relationship.

  • Keep us at tasks too hard for us that we may be driven to Thee for strength.

  • We have reached a point today where labor-saving devices are good only when they do not throw the worker out of his job.

    Eleanor Roosevelt (2007). “The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers: The human rights years, 1945-1948”, Charles Scribner's Sons
  • Do what you feel in your heart to be right - for you'll be criticized anyway. You'll be damned if you do, and damned if you don't.

    "How to Stop Worrying and Start Living". Book by Dale Carnegie, 1948.
  • the fundamental right of freedom of thought and expression is essential. If you curtail what the other fellow says and does, you curtail what you yourself may say and do.

    Eleanor Roosevelt, Allida Mae Black (2013). “Courage in a Dangerous World: The Political Writings of Eleanor Roosevelt”, p.244, Columbia University Press
  • We women are callow fledglings as compared with the wise old birds who manipulate the political machinery, and we still hesitate to believe that a woman can fill certain positions in public life as competently and adequately as a man. For instance, it is certain that women do not want a woman for President. Nor would they have the slightest confidence in her ability to fulfill the functions of that office. Every woman who fails in a public position confirms this, but every woman who succeeds creates confidence.

    Eleanor Roosevelt (1995). “What I Hope to Leave Behind: The Essential Essays of Eleanor Roosevelt”, Carlson Pub
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  • We hope you have found the saying you were looking for in our collection! At the moment, we have collected 519 quotes from the Former First Lady of the United States Eleanor Roosevelt, starting from October 11, 1884! We periodically replenish our collection so that visitors of our website can always find inspirational quotes by authors from all over the world! Come back to us again!
    Eleanor Roosevelt quotes about: Abuse Acceptance Adventure Age Aging Anger Appreciation Art Atheism Attitude Beauty Being Happy Being Strong Being Successful Being Yourself Belief Birthdays Books Business Caring Challenges Change Character Charity Children Choices Church Communication Communism Community Compromise Confidence Conscience Country Courage Criticism Critics Curiosity Decisions Democracy Depression Desire Determination Dignity Discrimination Diversity Doubt Dreams Duty Economy Education Efficiency Emotions Empowerment Encouraging Energy Experience Failing Fear Feelings Fighting First Lady Freedom Friends Friendship Future Giving Goals Gossip Growing Old Growth Happiness Heart Helping Others History Home Honor Hope Horror Human Dignity Human Rights Hunger Husband Imagination Individual Rights Inspiration Inspirational Inspiring Integrity Joy Justice Labor Leadership Learning Liberty Life Life And Love Live Life Losing Loss Love Lying Mankind Military Mistakes Morning Mothers Motivation Motivational Moving Forward Nature Nursing Old Age Opportunity Overcoming Pain Parties Past Patriotism Peace Personal Responsibility Political Parties Politics Positive Positivity Poverty Prejudice Progress Purpose Quality Reading Recovery Relationships Responsibility Running Sacrifice School Security Self Confidence Self Esteem Social Justice Soul Spirituality Strength Stress Success Suffering Tea Teaching Today Understanding United Nations Values War Water Weakness Wife Wisdom Work Youth

    Eleanor Roosevelt

    • Born: October 11, 1884
    • Died: November 7, 1962
    • Occupation: Former First Lady of the United States